How does one carry a Relay?


#6

As soon as I get mine, one of the first things I’ll be doing is 3D printing some sort of clip that can be connected to a lanyard as I share the same concern.


#7

Just thinking how a bout a tape measure pouch with clip an strap lock . The relay is about that size of a 50 ft tape, or less.


#8

How about something like this:

The mesh will offer some protection, while allowing the sound to pass through (I have a a small bluetooth speaker that came with something like this). You can even press buttons through the mesh without any trouble. And only about a buck each - can’t beat the price.

Just add a carabiner through the drawstring to attach it to belt loop, key ring, or lanyard for carrying.

Similar, but in black:

Couldn’t find one with a Republic or Relay logo, tho :wink:


#9

I just ordered one of each of the following armband products to test with our Relays (expected delivery Friday!) We have 6 and 10 year old sons. Hopefully one of these products fits the relay securely and is comfortable for either one of our boys to wear on either their arm, wrist or leg. We also have an older elastic zipper pouch that goes around your waist. We’ll test all these and report back after this weekend.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B018QGS67I

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07CG8B866


#10

For a non-pouch solution, perhaps one of these products by “TheClip”? They’ve been around forever; I’ve used them on phones and radios. They come with 3M adhesive pad that’s almost impossible to unstick once it’s been correctly applied.

There’s one that’s just a simple u-shaped plastic clip - good for belts, pockets, and waistbands:

and a fancier spring-loaded swivel clip that attaches to belt or waistband or whatever, and then mates with a small plastic stud that’s attached to the device:

Either one of these - especially the stud for the swivel clip - should attach to the back of the Relay quite easily. Just make sure you place it so as not to interfere with the charging cable.


#11

I would suggest a necklace format, that would work for girls. You can think of enhancing it aesthetically via accessories. Another is a brooch, that clips on upper chest, close to face. Or bow tie. The talk button can be located without looking so, it does not have to be taken off the shirt.


#12

This weekend I realized the brooch/clip/pin idea could be pretty useful because while out for a run I struggled to interact with the device (to hear messages in a noisy environment, press the button and talk into it) which was on my upper arm in the flexible arm band strap holder previously linked above.

Then the nerd in me realized how this would be similar to a combadge from Star Trek! Cool and nerdy.


#13

The flexible armband sleeve holder ended up being the better fit for the Relay. The other one is way too huge (the larger pouch fits my Nexus 6p with slim case), unless you wanted to use it to carry phone, Relay and some other stuff.

The flexible armband sleeve holder fit on my 10 year old son’s arm, as well as mine, but was too big for my 6 year old’s arm. It fit well on my 6 year old’s upper leg.


#14

LOL! Might be a bit awkward to use that way :rofl:


#15

haha, yeah.

Forgot to say, the Relay speakers and microphone worked really well through the flexible armband sleeve holder.


#16

My son’s first effort at a 3D printed carrier.


3d Printed Accesories
#17

These [grey and black mesh pouches] came today. They are both virtually identical apart from color. There is an inner fine mesh and some sort of thin foam to help keep out dirt and offer slight cushioning, but allows sound to pass through and doesn’t interfere with button pressing. Nice little bags.

OTOH, they’re quite a bit larger than necessary. One might could use them for storing or carrying one Relay with or without the charging cable and charger. Or up to four Relays - two stacks of two, side-by-side, fit perfectly and snugly in one of these bags.

Side note - my Nexus 6 just fits, with a mm or two sticking out the top. Most 5" or smaller phones will fit while allowing the drawstring to be closed. So a useful bag for smaller phones, accessories, etc.

Bottom line? As cheap as they were, I’ll keep 'em. Plenty of uses, including storing and transporting Relays, but probably not ideal as a on-person carrier.


#18

I’m thinking a lanyard like this would be a good solution for kids.

Lanyard

Another good option might be something like these phone rings. A small carabiner would allow it to attach to a belt loop or a regular lanyard.

Phone ring


#19

Good ideas!


#20

I think the Star Trek com badge is a great potential use case example, and hopefully they’ll work toward that in features. A real life example are Vocera badges used in many hospitals. I’d like to see them implement the “Call Jim” type functionality to call a specific person via voice recognition. They are a tremendous tool for large campus staff that need to communicate with one another.


#21

This is really great, we used 3D printing a lot when building Relay! We have a case accessory that will be shared out very shortly (can be used to clip to backpack or with a lanyard) and we will continue to solicit user feedback on additional accessories. I look forward to your son’s next creation!


#22

Some of the early versions of Relay used voice recognition to do exactly as you mention. It does work well for larger contact lists but it is not flawless especially with similar names and understanding kids voices. Our worst case scenario was you repeating a command many times before it works…like my kids do with Alexa quite often. For this reason we really wanted to simplify the initial experience. Regardless its a good idea and something we would like to continue to refine with our users to make Relay work for you.


#23

That’s exciting to hear that the accessory will be available soon @mnewton!


#24

The “box” is printed with flexible filament so that it can be flexed for getting the Relay in and out of the case. It works really well. He’s going to try to create some kind of clip (rather than a full box) next. Designing the curves that will require is tougher (and harder for the printer to print as not all surfaces are supported on the bed and supports with flexible filament are challenging) but I’m pretty impressed as to the prototypes he’s built so far given that he’s only 11!


#25

It’s the Fig Clip. The most versatile, powerful…ok im kidding. Enjoy

Just a little clip my son and I built and are happy to share it with the community. Take care.c60b20446ec27de5c96ad4479c5abf3a_preview_featured e0f6c3182f44bce73bb986087a489ddb_preview_tiny figclip